POSTED ON Thursday, 02.20.2014 / 3:23 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

When Blackhawks Head Coach Joel Quenneville registered his 693rd NHL win on Jan. 29 against Vancouver, he moved up to third on the NHL's list of winningest coaches.

In the top six throughout NHL history, five have Chicago connections:

Atop the list is Scotty Bowman, who in 30 seasons saw his teams emerge victorious 1,244 times in regular-season play, in a career capped off with nine Stanley Cups. Scotty coached five different teams and celebrated the Cup five times with Montreal, three with Detroit and once with Pittsburgh. Now with the Blackhawks as a Senior Advisor, you can add two more rings to that haul—plus his son, Stan, is the current GM.

Al Arbour ranks second on the NHL coaching wins list with 782 victories, 740 of which came with the New York Islanders, as he won four straight Stanley Cups (1979-83). Arbour, a defenseman and the only NHL player I know that ever wore glasses, played for the Blackhawks for three seasons, including the 1961 Cup-winning campaign.

As of the Olympic break, Coach Q has registered 695 wins with the Blackhawks, Colorado and St. Louis; he has two Cup titles here, and he was an assistant for the 1996 Colorado title team. Also, Quenneville ranks second in franchise history with 257 victories behind the Blackhawks bench, trailing Billy Reay, who had 516.

To reach third place, Coach Q passed up Hall-of-Famer Dick Irvin, Sr., who had 692 wins and four Stanley Cups—three with Montreal and one in Toronto. Irvin was named the first-ever Blackhawks captain in 1926 and served for three seasons before moving behind the Chicago bench for two years. However, Irvin clashed with GM Bill Tobin five games into the 1931 season and was fired. Irvin was hired shortly after by Toronto and led the Maple Leafs to the 1932 Stanley Cup. The organization brought Irvin back as Chicago's coach for the 1955-56 campaign, but he was in failing health.

The controversial Mike Keenan ranks sixth among the NHL's winningest coaches with 672 victories and one cup with the Rangers. "Iron Mike" is fifth on the Blackhawks coaching list, accruing 153 wins in four campaigns (1988-92) and serving one year as GM.

The only non-Hawks connection in the top six is Pat Quinn, with 684 triumphs in 21 years with five different teams.

While Quenneville is in his 17th season as a coach and his sixth in Chicago, he says he really doesn't keep track of the numbers, but is more interested in bringing home another Stanley Cup to the Blackhawk fans!

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POSTED ON Monday, 01.6.2014 / 10:19 AM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog
Glenn Hall, whose No. 1 jersey was retired by the Blackhawks in 1988, backstopped Chicago to the 1961 Stanley Cup, and just as impressively, played 503 consecutive games without wearing a mask.

In hockey, few would argue that to be successful, everything starts from your goalie on out. In December, with the Blackhawks' Stanley Cup-winning goalie Corey Crawford sidelined and backup Nikolai Khabibulin also injured, Chicago turned to rookie netminder Antti Raanta. The 24-year-old acquitted himself very well in the early going, and was named the NHL's Co-Rookie of the Month for his efforts.

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POSTED ON Monday, 12.30.2013 / 10:19 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog


Now into the second half of the schedule, the defending champion Blackhawks currently have 63 points and are on a pace to set a team-record regular season point total—with a shot at several others.

Outside of last season's NHL record total for a 48-game slate with 77 points, as well as 68 points through 41 games (half of a full slate), that start featured 24 games without a regulation defeat (21-0-3). If that pace had continued for 82 games, it would have meant a new NHL mark of 136 points.

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 12.3.2013 / 2:22 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

Now into the third month of the season, the conference races seem to be getting even tighter, while the watchword in every game mostly seems to be "closeness." After winning two Stanley Cups in four years, most of the Blackhawks' games so far in 2013-14 have been decided by one goal, as each opponent tries to boost their game against the champions.

Last season, the Blackhawks were triumphant in one-goal matches with a mark of 19-3-5 in the 48-game schedule. The playoffs were even more dramatic, with the Blackhawks notching eight victories and only two defeats in one-goal margins. That's including the dramatic comeback in

Games 6 and 7 against Detroit, culminating in Brent Seabrook's OT winner in the deciding contest. And no Blackhawk fan will ever forget the Cup-winning effort against Boston, with two-goals in 17 seconds—all coming in the final 76 seconds of regulation time.

The 2010 champions saw their one-goal mark at 16-13-9 during the regular schedule, but were more dominant in the playoffs, sporting a 6-1 edge in games decided by a lone marker; the other 10 victores were by two or more goals. Recalling the 2010 series, the dramatic comeback in Game 5 against Nashville at the UC stands out: Patrick Kane tallied a shorthander with 13 seconds left in regulation, then Marian Hossa scored the winner in OT after coming out of the

penalty box.

The 1961 Blackhawks finished third during the campaign in a six-team league and had a modest one-goal game record of 7-8-17 in the days before overtime. But in the opening series against favored Montreal, the Hawks were 2-1 in one-goal games, which included a triple-overtime win at the Stadium. Then, in Games 5 and 6, Glenn Hall blanked the Canadiens, and Chicago went on to beat Detroit for the title in six games.

The underdog 1938 Hawks were 8-7-9 in single-goal matches in the regular season, but went 4-0 in one-goal games in the playoffs. The first Cup titlists in 1934 saw a 10-8-11 mark in lone-goal decisions, but were 4-0-1 in the playoffs, capped by an overtime goal by Harold "Mush" March and a 1-0 Charlie Gardiner shutout against Detroit.

If the trend continues this season, while it would be nice to see a few more wide margins in victories, the key to success will still be winning the "close ones."

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 10.1.2013 / 3:08 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

Every NHL coach will agree that getting a season off to a fast start will go a long way in determining success. Certainly there is no better example than the defending Stanley Cup champion Blackhawks, who set a league record last season by picking points in their first 24 contests with a 21-0-3 mark.

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POSTED ON Monday, 08.26.2013 / 2:33 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog
The Blackhawks celebrate after clinching the Stanley Cup for the second time on April 12, 1938.

I don't know of anyone who is still around that was at the Chicago Stadium in 1934 and 1938 to see the Blackhawks capture the Stanley Cup on home ice.

While home ice is always preferred as an advantage, the Blackhawks have managed to take home Lord Stanley's trophy the last three times in enemy territory: 1961, 2010 and 2013. In fact, in the last six years, Los Angeles was the only team to win the Cup on home ice when they ousted New Jersey in six games.

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POSTED ON Wednesday, 07.31.2013 / 9:24 AM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog
Patrick Kane and the Blackhawks will begin the tough task of defending their 2013 Cup title on Oct. 1, when they raise their championship banner before taking on the Washington Capitals.

With every team targeting the defending Stanley Cup champions, the Blackhawks will try to become the first NHL team to repeat since 1998, when Detroit accomplished that feat (coached by Scotty Bowman, current Blackhawks Senior Advisor to Hockey Operations).

Chicago became the first squad to capture both the Presidents' Trophy for the league's best regular-season record and the Stanley Cup since Detroit turned the trick in 2008. And by becoming the first team to win a second title since the hard salary cap went into effect and setting a new record by starting the season with a 24-game point streak, the players know their opponents will use every contest as a measuring stick against them.

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POSTED ON Monday, 06.17.2013 / 2:03 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

While this is only the seventh time in Blackhawks history that they have faced off in the playoffs against Boston, it all started in 1926-27 when Chicago joined the NHL.

The Bruins won that first series in two games based on total goals (10-5). In 1938, when the Hawks won their second Stanley Cup despite a losing record, Boston had the best regular-season record, but lost in the semis to New York. The Bruins won the Cup in 1939 and established an NHL record with 74 points in 48 games, which was broken this season by the Blackhawks, who collected 77 points.

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POSTED ON Saturday, 06.1.2013 / 5:51 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

There are 26 NHL teams that would rather be using hockey sticks instead of golf clubs while the Blackhawks and their three counterparts continue the battle for the Stanley Cup. Chicago became just the 21st team in NHL history to overcome a 3-1 series deficit to move on. Of course, the triumph came with some controversy, when Niklas Hjalmarsson's goal with 1:47 remaining in regulation was negated by a referee's whistle while two players were fighting near the Detroit bench. Fortunately, Brent Seabrook's goal at 3:35 of overtime has helped ease that angst as the Hawks have moved to the conference finals.

I don't want to mislead you, because besides the work I do for the team, I am a Blackhawks fan! It is easy to criticize a referee's call. All you have to remember is Game 6 at Detroit, when I'm sure most of the Red Wings faithful questioned the penalty shot call that resulted in Michael Frolik's game-winning goal to tie the series.

I was fortunate to be sitting in the first balcony at the Stadium on April 4, 1959, for Game 6 of the playoff semifinals against the Montreal Canadiens. Montreal was up 3-2 in the series against Chicago, which was making its first playoff appearance in six years and facing the defending champs. Red Storey was considered the best referee in the league; it wound up being his last NHL game.

The Hawks kept taking the lead, but the Canadiens tripped Ed Litzenberger once, then scored to tie the game.Then two more times, Bobby Hull was tripped in the third period, and both times the visitors took the puck up ice to score and win the game 5-4 in the final 90 seconds, and ultimately the series.

All three times, Storey failed to call a penalty against the Canadiens, and fans showered the ice for more than 30 minutes. When the game ended, two fans ran onto the ice trying to get at him, but were halted, one by the stick of Montreal's Doug Harvey. NHL Commissioner Clarence Campbell was at the game and was asked about Storey's officiating. He told the press that "Storey choked!"

So while the whistle prevented Hjalmarsson's goal last Wednesday, Seabrook eventually came through. Remember, the referees try to call them as they see them, and hopefully their decisions don't affect the final score. Go Hawks!

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POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.9.2013 / 2:33 PM CT
By Harvey Wittenberg - Web Contributor / The Blackhawks Blog

This has been a season of sports streaks, with the Blackhawks setting two and aiming for another NHL mark.

The Hawks went 24 games to start a campaign without a regulation loss, earning at least a point in every contest. Ray Emery became the first NHL goalie to start a season with 12 straight victories.

Now the Hawks have a chance to set a new NHL mark for most points in a 48-game season—the previous high belongs to Boston, who recorded 74 points in 1938-39 on their way to the Stanley Cup. The last regular 48-game schedule was in 1941-42, although the labor-shortened campaign of 1994-95 saw Detroit rack up 70 points in 48 contests.

Reviewing the streaks that the four previous Chicago Stanley Cup winners enjoyed takes us back to 1933-34. That squad wound up 20-17-11 with a second-place finish in the American Division, and their longest string of wins was seven games (4-0-3). The Hawks were paced by goalie Charlie Gardiner, who beat both Montreal teams in the NHL back then (Canadiens and Maroons) before the team defeated Detroit for the Cup with a dramatic overtime goal in Game 4 of the best-of-five series.

The 1938 champions remain the only NHL team to claim the Cup with a losing regular-season record (14-25-9), doing so with a roster that boasted eight American-born players. They had just one modest three-game win streak. In the playoffs, they knocked off Montreal, then New York. In meeting the favored Maple Leafs for the finals, they had to use minor-league goalie Alfie Moore in the opener. Chicago won that game 3-1 and grabbed the Cup by winning the best-of-five series 3-1.

The 1960-61 winners were paced by Bobby Hull, Stan Mikita, Pierre Pilote and goalie Glenn Hall. They posted a 29-24-17 mark and had a seven-game win streak. In the playoffs, they upset the Canadiens in the semis as Hall shutout Montreal in the last two games and then dispatched Detroit in the finals.

The 2010 Cup champions set a franchise regular-season mark with 112 points in the standings (52-22-8) and enjoyed an eight-game win streak during the campaign. The playoff run saw the Hawks oust Nashville, Vancouver and then sweep San Jose before Patrick Kane's dramatic overtime goal in Philadelphia brought the Cup back to Chicago for the first time in 49 years.

With a record-breaking streak to start the season, the Hawks hope to carry momentum into the playoffs and bring the Cup back to their loyal fans!

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